Overdrive Magazine

September 2019

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September 2019 | Overdrive | 5 definitely a step in the right direc- tion." David: "We need to be able to stop the 14-hour clock. Delay times at shippers and receivers are eating us alive." Not all readers thought the three- hour pause for the 14-hour clock (with a 10-hour break aer the duty day) was a great idea. Some see po- tential for supply chain parties to ex- ploit the extra time for their benefit. Jon Nazars: "Oh, so you mean shippers and receivers will now take an extra three hours to load or unload us since they know we'll be able to do that? Why doesn't FMCSA allow DOT cops and state troopers to be able to [ticket and fine] the shippers and receivers for holding drivers past a certain time? ... is isn't going to solve anything until they go aer these supply chain logistics compa- nies." Perry: "Aer implementation, every day will become a 17-hour day at most carriers." Logan Tarr wondered at the many complaints. "Sounds good to me, I don't really know what y'all want? ey take away flexibility (ELD man- date) and you complain, they try to add flexibility and you complain." Visit OVERDRIVEONLINE.COM/OVERDRIVERADIO to hear the podcasts featured here and more from our weekly series. Alternately, subscribe to the podcast via iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, Google Music, Spotify or other podcasting app. With kids gone, couple sees appeal of team driving | Tommy and Linda Bryant of Hartsville, Tennessee, have about a year over the road as a company small fleet team pulling a dry van and loving life to- gether aer a mid-life career switch. With the kids grown and out of the house, the Bryants already were spending the vast majority of their days together running a small Hartsville café, the Early Bird, today owned and operated by a son. A road trip out west, though, gave them an idea of how they could maximize that precious commodity of time together. And though the Bryants may be new to trucking, it hasn't taken them long to see, as both point out, the poten- tial value of more flexible sleeper splits beyond the 8/2 split currently available, particularly for their team operation. A truck stop up from the flood | Getting close to the 10th anniversary of the major flooding of Nashville, Tennessee, in 2010, employees at the downtown TA who were there when it happened recount the rising waters, their relationships with longtime driver customers and the recovery process. e team you'll hear is pic- tured, from le: Longtime fuel-desk cashier Marie "Granny" Duke, technician Steve Whitmore, service inventory manager Shay Rucker, Donna Dement (also on the fuel desk), regional service manager David Green and technician Matt Lasher. ey're standing in the ves- tibule to the interior where a painting featuring Nashville country music icons is displayed. Also in the podcast: Why are some TA Petro stops moving away from traditional diners? Senior VP Tom Liutkus notes the hours of service rule has something to do with it. What would you do for another 1-2 mpg? | How's this sound: A six-year odyssey of designing and patenting modifications to your truck's engine and related systems — reducing the draw on the engine from the main fan, A/C system and more. at's what inventor and indepen- dent owner-operator Kenny Capell did. Based in East Tennessee, Capell continues to modify his 2003 Freight- liner Columbia and Detroit engine to get to the point where not only is he achieving about a mile-and-a-half fuel mileage benefit, he's also moving toward eliminating idling with the in- tegrated system, which he's patented with his sister, Patti Lane. Pictured here is the main engine fan, now with four electric fans, shown when his partners at OTR Truck and Trailer Repair in Dalton, Georgia, modified the housing to a steel design from a less-stable aluminum one. Hear more about the project in the podcast. OVERDRIVE RADIO

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